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Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Sts. Cornelius and Cyprian


Ordinary Time: September 16th


Today the Church commemorates two friends in the service of Christ and his Church. Cornelius, a Roman, was the twenty-first Pope during the reign of the Emperor Gallus and Volusian. He had to oppose Novatian, the first anti-pope, who believed that apostates who repented could not be forgiven. Helped by St. Cyprian, Cornelius confirmed his papal authority. 

St. Cornelius
Pope Cornelius (251-253) was the successor to Pope Fabian. During his reign a controversy arose concerning the manner of reinstating those who had fallen from the faith under the duress of persecution. The Novatians accused the Pope of too great indulgence and separated themselves from the Church. With the help of St. Lucina, Cornelius transferred the remains of the princes of the apostles to places of greater honor. On account of his successful preaching, the pagans banished him to Centumcellae, where he died. 

St. Cyprian
Thascius Caecilius Cyprianus, illustrious as a pagan rhetorician in Carthage, embraced the true faith in the year 246 and was soon thereafter consecrated priest and bishop of that city (248). He was an energetic shepherd of souls and a prolific writer. He defended the unity of the Church against schismatic movements in Africa and Italy and greatly influenced the shaping of Church discipline relative to reinstating Christians who had apostatized. He fled during the Decian persecution, but guided the Church by means of letters. During the Valerian persecution (258) he was beheaded. He suffered martyrdom in the presence of his flock, after giving the executioner twenty-five pieces of gold. St. Jerome says of him: "It is superfluous to speak of his greatness, for his works are more luminous than the sun."

Pope Francis says ‘one can speak of’ a 3rd world war already occurring


Catholic World News - September 15, 2014


(...) Concelebrating Mass with bishops from Italy, Austria, Hungary, Croatia, and Slovenia, Pope Francis linked the decision to go to war to the words of Cain in the Book of Genesis:

    Greed, intolerance, the lust for power: these motives underlie the decision to go to war, and they are too often justified by an ideology; but first there is a distorted passion or impulse. Ideology is presented as a justification and when there is no ideology, there is the response of Cain: "What does it matter to me? Am I my brother’s keeper?" (cf. Gen 4:9). War does not look directly at anyone, be they elderly, children, mothers, fathers…. "What does it matter to me?"

    Above the entrance to this cemetery, there hangs in the air those ironic words of war, "What does it matter to me?" Each one of the dead buried here had their own plans, their own dreams… but their lives were cut short. Humanity said, "What does it matter to me?"

    Even today, after the second failure of another world war, perhaps one can speak of a third war, one fought piecemeal, with crimes, massacres, destruction.

    In all honesty, the front page of newspapers ought to carry the headline, "What does it matter to me?" Cain would say, "Am I my brother’s keeper?"

“Today, too, the victims are many,” he continued. “How is this possible? It is so because in today’s world, behind the scenes, there are interests, geopolitical strategies, lust for money and power, and there is the manufacture and sale of arms, which seem to be so important! And these plotters of terrorism, these schemers of conflicts, just like arms dealers, have engraved in their hearts, ‘What does it matter to me?’”  (...)

Monday, September 15, 2014

Our Lady of Sorrows

Ordinary Time: September 15th

This feast dates back to the 12th century. It was especially promoted by the Cistercians and the Servites, so much so that in the 14th and 15th centuries, it was widely celebrated throughout the Catholic Church.

This feast is dedicated to the spiritual martyrdom of Mary, Mother of God, and her compassion with the sufferings of her Divine Son, Jesus. In her suffering as co-redeemer, she reminds us of the tremendous evil of sin and shows us the way of true repentance. May the numerous tears of the Mother of God be conducive to our salvation; with which tears Thou, O God, art able to wash away the sins of the whole world.

As Mary stood at the foot of the Cross, on which Jesus hung, the sword of sorrow Simeon had foretold pierced her soul. Below are the seven sorrows of Mary:

The prophecy of Simeon (Luke 2:25-35)
The flight into Egypt (Matthew 2:13-15)
Loss of the Child Jesus for three days (Luke 2:41-50)
Mary meets Jesus on his way to Calvary (Luke 23:27-31; John 19:17)
Crucifixion and Death of Jesus (John 19:25-30)
The body of Jesus being taken from the Cross (Psalm 130; Luke 23:50-54; John 19:31-37)
The burial of Jesus (Isaiah 53:8; Luke 23:50-56; John 19:38-42; Mark 15:40-47)

Source

Brain 'can classify words during sleep'

11 September 2014


The brain is still active while we are asleep, say scientists, who found people were able to classify words during their slumber.

Researchers from Cambridge and Paris introduced participants to a word test while awake and found they continued to respond correctly while asleep.

The sleeping brain can perform complex tasks, particularly if the task is automated, the study says. (...)

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